Ecovillage Response to the Climate Emergency

We may be the final generation of humans but we could still evolve into the first generation of eco-humans.

Albert Bates

--

As I post this, I am knee-deep in presenting a webinar, hosted by the Global Ecovillage Network, on the theme of ecovillage responses to climate change. Let me reprise some of my talk from that event here, starting with the latest weather reports and a year in review.

Last week Australia’s Southeastern coast area — New South Wales near Sydney — upgraded its wildfire risk from “extremely dangerous” to “catastrophic.” Even though there may be no nearby fires, the catastrophic warning means schools and public offices have been closed and residents are urged to leave.

Local residents don’t require much urging. If the trauma of their 2019–2020 wildfire season is not fresh enough, they all saw what happened in Maui. The wildfire that broke out on Aug. 8, six weeks ago, scorched through the town of Lahaina at 60 miles per hour, reducing ten square miles of city to ash in mere minutes. Only a month before, wildfire forced evacuation of Yellowknife, the capital of Canada’s Northwest Territories.

Last month a buoy in Manatee Bay, south of Miami, registered 101.1 degrees, a reading that, as the Washington Post put it, is “more typical of a hot tub than ocean water.”

Elizabeth Kolbert

Australia is surrounded by the hottest Southern Ocean ever recorded. It is likely to reach 2.3 to 2.5 °C above average by the end of the year.

Mintec Analytics, which delivers market prices and analysis for thousands of commodities, food ingredients and associated materials to the world’s largest food and manufacturing brands says that “One of the most direct effects is the increase in ocean…

--

--

Albert Bates

Emergency Planetary Technician and Climate Science Wonk — using naturopathic remedies to recover the Holocene without geoengineering or ponzinomics.